Play Craps With Winning Strategies: Placing Across the Board With COME Bets

In my last article on how to play craps, I tackled the rules of the Pass Line and the Don’t Pass Bar. For this article, I will show you how to play craps with the tool of understanding probability. Below, I have created a dice diagram to visually explain the probability of each number rolling in a typical craps game.

Possible 2 = 1 + 1

Possible 3’s = 1 + 2 and 2 + 1

Possible 4’s = 1 + 3 and 3 + 1 and 2 + 2

Possible 5’s = 1 + 4 and 4 + 1 and 2 + 3 and 3 + 2

Possible 6’s = 1 + 5 and 5 + 1 and 2 + 4 and 4 + 2 and 3 + 3

Possible 7’s = 1 + 6 and 6 + 1 and 2 + 5 and 5 + 2 and 3 + 4 and 4 + 3

Possible 8’s = 2 + 6 and 6 + 2 and 3 + 5 and 5 + 3 and 4 + 4

Possible 9’s = 3 + 6 and 6 + 3 and 4 + 5 and 5 + 4

Possible 10’s = 4 + 6 and 6 + 4 and 5 + 5

Possible 11’s = 5 + 6 and 6 + 5

Possible 12 = 6 + 6

NOTICE: There are 36 possible dice combinations. The 7 is the most commonly rolled number with 6 possible combinations resulting in a statistical probability of 1 in 6 rolls.

Below this is a payout diagram for odds through place betting:

4 & 10: Pay $9 for every $5 bet

5 & 9: Pay $7 for every $5 bet

6 & 8: Pay $7 for every $6 bet

Below this is a payout diagram for odds through COME betting:

4 & 10: Pay 2:1 ($2 for every $1 bet) + EVEN MONEY for initial bet

5 & 9: Pay 3:2 ($3 for every $2 bet) + EVEN MONEY for initial bet

6 & 8: Pay 6:5 ($6 for every $5 bet) + EVEN MONEY for initial bet

The main numbers that I will use in describing how to play craps through three distinct winning strategies are numbers 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, and 10. These are called point numbers. Any other number is not a point number. For the following strategy of how to play craps wait until the game is beginning. Look for the puck to say OFF to begin.

Placing/COME Betting – Minimum of $300 bankroll for $5 table

To play craps using this strategy you will NOT make a Pass Line or Don’t Pass wager. As a result, you cannot shoot the dice. Thus you can only play craps using this strategy if there are other players at the table besides yourself.

Scenario

Let’s suppose the shooter rolls a point of 6. Now, place all numbers, including the point, for the minimum amount. This will cost a total of $32 ($5 for numbers 4, 5, 9, and 10 and $6 for numbers 6 and 8). After you place all the numbers, and before the next roll, make another bet by placing a $5 chip in the COME box. Suppose on the second roll, the shooter rolls an 8. First you would get paid $7 for your place bet on the 8. Your COME bet would then go to the 8 and you could take odds on this bet. Toss three $5 chips and make an odds bet on your COME bet through the 8.

NOTE: When COME bets go to the 6 or 8 take 3x (triple) odds. For the 5 or 9 take 2x (double) odds. For the 4 or 10 take 1x (single) odds.

When your COME bet goes to the 8, tell the dealer to take your placed 8 bet down because you do not want to cover the same number through two different wagers. Then, make another bet in the COME box. Let’s say the shooter rolls a 9. You would get paid $7 for your $5 place bet on the 9 and your COME bet would move to the 9. Now that you have two COME bets active, ask the dealer to take ALL place bets down. Make sure to toss two $5 chips for your odds on the 9.

Currently, you have the 8 and the 9 through the COME and you have won $14 through your place bets. So far you are up $14 and you are risking $35. In a worst case scenario, a 7 rolls next, you will have only lost $21. However, if you notice the dice chart, a 7 can roll six different ways. Since there are 36 possible dice combinations, a 7 will statistically roll once every six rolls. In this scenario you were able to play craps through place betting and COME betting, setting up your bets in only three rolls. Therefore, using this strategy to play craps, you would have at least two more rolls to make even more money back and, ultimately, a profit.

Let’s suppose the shooter rolls an 8 next. You would then get paid $5 for your initial COME bet and $18 for your odds bet. If you are confused please look at the table above for a visual aide. The dealer would then give you back your investment and your winnings on the 8. Therefore, it only takes one COME bet to hit in order to make all your money back. At this point, you have a profit of $2 if a 7 rolls next. However, the next roll would be the fifth roll and a 7 is not due, according to probability, until the sixth roll. This means you still have a decent chance to win on your 9 COME bet, resulting in a total profit of $22 on two COME bets.

If you want to play craps more conservatively for this system, simply take 1x (single odds) on all COME bets instead of the typical (1x, 2x, 3x). This way, you can risk less, but still have great potential to make a profit. On my next article on how to play craps I will explain the strategy of “placing the inside.”

How to Play Splits – A Dealer’s Choice Poker Game

If playing poker is your cup of tea, you already know that gathering with a group of friends for Dealer’s Choice provides hours upon hours of exciting entertainment. Dealer’s Choice poker offers a plethora of interesting and exciting fast-paced games with nearly endless possibilities. One such game, which happens to be one of my favorites, is called “Splits,” or “Hit the Number.”

Rules and game play for Splits are extremely easy to follow. To begin the game, two random target numbers are chosen, with the object being to obtain a point total as close to or equal to one of the two chosen numbers. More common target number choices for Splits include 7 – 27, 5 1/2 – 21 1/2, or 13 – 33. In each of these examples, there is at least a 15-point difference, and one of the sets even works with half numbers. This is for a couple of reasons. First, Splits is, a split-pot poker game, in which the winnings are almost always divided between at least two players. For example, in 13 – 33, at the end of the game, the gamblers nearest to 13 points and nearest to 33 points split the pot down the middle. Second, all face cards are worth a mere half point, while aces are worth either 1 or 11 points. All numbered cards are worth their face value. Therefore, if playing 5 1/2 – 21 1/2, it is possible to hit half numbers, as well as whole ones.

Splits is dealt out like 5-Card Stud with one major difference. The game is not even close to being over after each player has five cards. A player can choose to draw as many cards as he wants, even if he has already opted not to draw during a previous round. To explain, after antes have been paid, the dealer gives each player two cards in a normal clockwise rotation, one face down and one face up. For the sake of betting after each round, the player with the highest point total showing on the board starts off by either betting checking. After a round of betting, the dealer then (once again in a clockwise rotation) asks everyone if they would like another card. If at anytime your point total matches the amount of points required for that particular Splits game, then do not draw anymore cards, as you are already guaranteed half of the pot. A player can pass on drawing a card at anytime, then come back and draw on a subsequent turn if desired. This is sometimes done by a gambler to increase pot size if he is already locked in for half of the winnings, and increasing his point total, even by 10 points, will not matter.

After each round of drawing a card, a round of betting begins. When no one wants to draw anymore cards, there is a final round of betting, then the hand is over. The two players closest to the two selected Splits numbers with their own total points are the winners. Therefore, if you are playing 13 – 33 and you have 13 points on the nose, you split the winnings with the one closest to 33 points since those are your target numbers. Also, unless there are exceptions, a player can overshoot a number and still be closest to it to win (i.e. 33 1/2 points is still a winner over 32 points if playing 13 – 33). The only times a pot is not divided directly in half is when either one player can total both amounts by using aces (i.e. three aces will give a player both 13 and 33 points, like The Wheel, giving him the entire pot) or if two players are equidistant from a target number (i.e. if one player has 12 points and one has 14 points, they will each take a quarter of the pot, while the player closest to 33 points takes the other half). And since two people usually end up splitting the winnings, pot sizes in Splits can become fairly large, adding even more excitement to an already fun-filled, Dealer’s Choice poker game.

Even if by some odd reason you become bored with Splits, variations can be easily utilized. Some ideas include changing the dealer after each betting round, using number combos that are further apart (like 21 – 51 or 9 1/2 – 44 1/2), just counting red cards and making black cards worth zero points, or not being able to exceed your target number (as in Blackjack or 21). Whatever options you decide to choose will definitely increase the excitement level of the game. In fact, even without any variations applied, I am sure you will find Splits to be very fulfilling, constantly keeping you on the edge of your poker seat.